Angeldust - My Video Collection

My Video Collection

After cataloguing my music collection I thought it was about time I did my films as well.  I have controversially listed all sequels alongside their original counterpart so that series can be viewed as one.  Many thanks to  Amazon for the plagiarised review data & artwork, where available this has saved me an enormous amount of time.

Please select a letter to browse by title:

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The Gate To The Minds Eye - Animation
                                                                                                                                                                                              
An early DVD release with CG visuals set to electronic music from the likes of Thomas Dolby. Has aged pretty badly by todays standards but is still an enjoyable watch. NB 
Gattaca

Confidently conceived and brilliantly executed, Gattaca had a somewhat low profile release in 1997, but audiences and critics hailed the film's originality. It's since been recognised as one of the most intelligent science fiction films of the 1990s. Writer-director Andrew Niccol, the talented New Zealander who also wrote the acclaimed Jim Carrey vehicle The Truman Show, depicts a near-future society in which one's personal and professional destiny is determined by one's genes. In this society, "Valids" (genetically engineered) qualify for positions at prestigious corporations, such as Gattaca, which grooms its most qualified employees for space exploration. "In-Valids" (naturally born), such as the film's protagonist, Vincent (Ethan Hawke), are deemed genetically flawed and subsequently fated to low-level occupations in a genetically caste society. With the help of a disabled "Valid" (Jude Law), Vincent subverts his society's social and biological barriers to pursue his dream of space travel;; any random mistake--and an ongoing murder investigation at Gattaca--could reveal his plot. Part thriller, part futuristic drama and cautionary tale, Gattaca establishes its social structure so convincingly that the entire scenario is chillingly believable. With Uma Thurman as the woman who loves Vincent and identifies with his struggle, Gattaca is both stylish and smart, while Jude Law's performance lends the film a note of tragic and heartfelt humanity. - Jeff Shannon
Ghostbusters

Dan Aykroyd and Harold Ramis wrote the script, but Bill Murray gets all the best lines and moments in this 1984 comedy directed by Ivan Reitman (Meatballs). The three comics, plus Ernie Hudson, play the New York City-based team that provides supernatural pest control, and Sigourney Weaver is the love interest possessed by an ancient demon. Reitman and company are full of original ideas about hobgoblins--who knew they could "slime" people with green plasma goo?--but hovering above the plot is Murray's patented ironic view of all the action. Still a lot of fun, and an obvious model for sci-fi comedies such as Men in Black. - Tom Keogh
  The Ghost - Korean

When she experiments with a Ouija board with her friends, Ji-won begins to suffer from dark flashbacks from her past. Things take an even sinister turn when three of her friends are found dead. Could the deaths be connected somehow with Ji-won's past? - Amazon Synopsis
Ghost Game - Thai

In a disused prison camp where thousands of innocent victims were once brutally murdered, the most extreme reality TV show ever devised is about to go on air.   11 contestants only have to survive one night within its chilling and blood-stained walls to walk away with a fortune. But little do they know their presence will release the tormented souls of the murdered who are determined to seek indiscriminate vengeance on those still living. As an entire nation watches on, the contrived ‘tasks’ set by the TV producers soon take on a life of their own and the contestants realise they face a terrifying supernatural battle to survive. - Amazon Synopsis
Ghost In The Shell - Japanise Anime

The skilful blending of drawn animation and computer-generated imagery excited anime fans when this science fiction mystery was released in 1995: many enthusiasts believe Ghost suggests what the future of anime will be, at least in the short term. The film is set in the not-too-distant future, when an unnamed government uses lifelike cyborgs or "enhanced" humans for undercover work. One of the key cyborgs is the Major, Motoko Kusanagi, who resembles a cross between the Terminator and a Playboy centrefold. She finds herself caught up in a tangled web of espionage and counterespionage as she searches for the mysterious superhacker known as "The Puppet Master." Mamoru Oshii directs with a staccato rhythm, alternating sequences of rapid-fire action (car chases, gun battles, explosions) with static dialogue scenes that allow the characters to sort out the vaguely mystical and rather convoluted plot. Kusanagi's final quote from I Corinthians suggests that electronic evolution may compliment and eventually supplant organic evolution. The minor nudity, profanity and considerable violence would earn Ghost in the Shell at least a PG rating. - Charles Solomon
Ghost In The shell 2: Innocence - Japanese Anime

Mamoru Oshii's landmark Ghost in the Shell (1995) largely defined the cyberpunk genre and influenced the Matrix films in the U.S. The long-awaited sequel continues the adventures of Batou, Major Kusanagi's former assistant, who was left behind when she disappeared into the cyber-realm of the Net. With his new human partner, Togusa, Batou investigates a series of bloody murders involving gynoids, robots with sexual functions. The case leads them to the headquarters of the Locus Solus company, where Batou uncovers the evil secret behind the creation of the gynoids. Innocence includes some staggeringly beautiful CG images, especially a parade depicting characters from Chinese mythology. Oshii contrasts this glittering beauty with a Blade Runner-esque dystopia. But even his skill as a director can't disguise the fact that the underdeveloped story and flat characters are far less interesting than the opulent visuals. - Charles Solomon
Girl, Interrupted

Ok, so this is a bit of a girls film, but for anyone who has experienced a degree of alienation & depression on their travels to adulthood this is essential viewing.  Showing the medieval approach taken by society when her parents fail to understand her behaviour, the film follows the adventure of a young woman sent to an institution for girls suffering from behavoural & emotional problems.  The acting is superb throughout hooking you into each of the characters problems & the way they all live together despite their differences.  NB

Go Go

Director Doug Liman's follow-up to the winning Swingers is a rollicking adventure that, while lacking in any substantial plot, speeds along with non-stop adrenaline and style to burn. Taking a cue from Pulp Fiction, Liman plays tricks with time and overlapping plots, all of which play out in L.A. and Las Vegas in a 24-hour period sometime between Christmas and New Year's. Slacker grocery-store clerk Ronna (Sarah Polley) is trying to score rent money by selling hits of Ecstasy at a rave party, but winds up inadvertently double-crossing a ruthless dealer (sexy and scary Timothy Olyphant). She's also invading the dealing turf of her coworker Simon (Desmond Askew), a Brit on his first trip to Vegas, which turns nightmarish after a jaunt with pal Marcus (Taye Diggs) to a "gentleman's club" turns violent. And then there's the two soap-opera actors (Jay Mohr and Scott Wolf) who cross paths with Ronna more than once in their attempts to divest themselves of a drug-related charge by participating in a sting. The way Liman and writer John August layer these stories owes a huge debt to Quentin Tarantino, but the comedy and action sequences rocket like a bat out of hell with energy, humour, and genuine surprise. In addition to some hilarious dialogue exchanges--including a classic scene between Ronna's stoned friend (Nathan Bexton) and a Zen cat--Liman works wonders with one the most winning ensembles in recent memory, a cast that includes both established actors and TV cuties. Mohr, Diggs, and especially Polley (doing a 180 from her turn in The Sweet Hereafter) are as excellent as you'd expect, but it's Wolf (of Party of Five) and Dawson's Creek's Katie Holmes (as Polley's best bud) who turn in revelatory work;; Holmes especially seems poised to be a breakout star. An amazing cinematic ride--like a roller coaster, you'll want to go back again and again. - Mark Englehart

Godzilla

As "gigantic monster reptile attacks New York" movies go, you've got to admit that Godzilla delivers the goods, although its critical drubbing and box-office disappointment were arguably deserved. It's a shameless, uninspired crowd-pleaser that's content to serve up familiar action with the advantage of really fantastic special effects, and if you expect nothing more you'll be one among millions of satisfied customers. There's really no other way to approach it--you just have to accept the fact that Independence Day creators Roland Emmerich and Dean Devlin are unapologetic plagiarists, incapable of anything more than mindless spectacle that can play in any cinema in the world without dubbing or subtitles. The whole movie plays out like a series of highlights stolen from previous blockbusters of the 1990s; it's little more than a rehash of the Jurassic Park movies. The derivative script is so trivial that it's unworthy of comment, apart from a few choice laughs and the casting of Michael Lerner as New York's mayor, whose name is Ebert and who closely resembles a certain well-known movie critic. Perhaps that's a clever hint that this movie's essentially critic-proof. It's stupid but it's fun, and for most audiences that's a fitting definition of mainstream Hollywood entertainment. - Jeff Shannon

Gravity
Gravity

George Clooney and Sandra Bullock star in this award-winning sci-fi thriller directed by Alfonso Cuarón. Seasoned astronaut Matt Kowalsky (Clooney) is on his final mission in space, while medical engineer Dr. Ryan Stone (Bullock) is making her first outing on the Space Shuttle. While they are engaged in extra-vehicular activity, debris collides into the shuttle, damaging it irreparably. Kowalsky and Stone now find themselves drifting in space with low oxygen supplies and cut off from all communication on Earth. They work together in their attempt to survive but will they make it back to solid ground? The film was nominated for ten Academy Awards and won seven including Best Cinematography (Emmanuel Lubezki), Best Director (Cuarón) and Best Original Score (Steven Price), and also picked up the Golden Globe for Best Director and BAFTAs for Best Director and Outstanding British Film.
Ju-On The Grudge - Japanese

Among the scariest movies ever put on celluloid, like its similarly styled sister, RINGU, this tale of death-by-curse is nothing short of blood chilling. With chapters named after each subsequent victim, it plays like a series of increasingly daunting, deadly vignettes. All of the stories surround a haunted house where the evil spirit of a 5-year-old boy still lurks. The first to enter the residence and be cursed is a young hospice worker visiting an elderly client. She finds the boy duct-taped in a closet, where he first appears to her in the form of a black cat, and then shows his human form which is a shockingly ghoulish white face and blackened eyes. Invisible to all except for those who are next to die, his presence seems like a true mystery. But when family members, friends, curious teenagers, and frightened police investigators begin to drop like flies, it is clear that his spirit thrives. Perhaps it is the unsolvable problem of the boy's vengeance that makes the premise so terrifying--his anger and his penalty cannot be curbed. But unforgettable scenes, such as the boy's very dead mother crawling serpentinely down the stairway, deserve the lion's share of the credit for the fearfulness of the film. What's more, the percussive, electronic score by Shiro Sato is spine-tingling. From Japanese director Takeshi Shimizu, whose RINGU was so successful that it received both prequels and sequels--and a Hollywood remake, THE RING, with Naomi Watts--fans should not miss this extraordinary fright-fest.

Ju-On The Grudge 2 Ju-On The Grudge 2 - Japanese

The Grudge 2 is a spooky installment in Takashi Shimizu's hardworking Ju-on/Grudge series of horror pictures. It doesn't carry the disorienting thrill of the very first Japanese Ju-on features, but it's a lot creepier than anybody could have expected. The story picks up from the end of the first Hollywood version of The Grudge, and has nothing to do with Ju-on 2, Shimizu's Japanese sequel. Sarah Michelle Gellar returns (a distinctly supporting role) as an American woman traumatized by her experiences with a haunted house in Tokyo;; younger sister Amber Tamblyn flies over to help out. This particular storyline doesn't have much meat on it;; the murder house is still there, and people who go inside have a disconcerting habit of dropping dead. Fortunately, two other plots thread into the basic one: a group of American schoolgirls in Tokyo become intrigued by the legend of the house, and some Chicago apartment dwellers are unsettled by domestic anxiety and the weird sounds coming from next door. (This storyline, featuring Jennifer Beals, gives the film its extremely satisfying opening sequence.) As usual with these movies, sequences come to us in non-chronological order, and it's up to us to piece it together. You can guess where the film is going, but the slow trajectory toward its final sequences is surprisingly involving. The movie was widely panned upon its release, which says more about the presumption of the law of diminishing sequel returns than the film itself--it's a decent little horror flick. - Robert Horton

Ju-On The Grudge: White & Black Ghost - Japanese

Ju-on: White Ghost:  A son brutally and methodically murders all five of his family members after failing the bar exam. He then hangs himself. At the moment of his death, he made a cassette tape recording in which he can be heard saying 'I'll go, I'll go soon...'. On the same tape can be heard the eerie sound of a young girl's voice. It is the voice of Mirai, who was a friend of Akane, whilst at primary school. Mirai was a victim of the mass family slaughter incident. Akane, who is now a senior high school student, has had a strong ESP power since childhood. Suddenly one day Mirai appears in front of her, wearing the yellow cap and red backpack of a primary school student. The terror is just about to begin... - Official Synopsis

Ju-on: Black GhostL  Nurse Yuko is left in charge of a young girl called Fukie, and begins to experience strange things. Medical examinations reveal that there is a 'cyst' in Fukie's body. The cyst is actually an unborn one that is full of hatred for mankind and curses everyone around her. Yuko's neighbour is taken by a girl in black, and Fukie's father commits a murder and goes insane. Fukie's mother has to rely on the special psychic powers of Fukie's younger sister to help drive out the evil spirit. However, the exorcism eventually fails, and the worst grudge yet begins. - Official Synopsis

The Grudge - US

It's not the scary hit that The Ring was in 2002, but The Grudge makes a similarly convincing case for American remakes of popular Japanese horror films. Barely a year passed between the release of Takashi Shimizu's creepy ghost story Ju-On: The Grudge and the production of this American remake, set in Tokyo and starring Sarah Michelle Gellar in her first post-Buffy horror film. About the only significant difference between the two films is the importing of a mostly-American cast (including Bill Pullman, Clea DuVall and Grace Zabriskie), but The Grudge was reconfigured (by screenwriter Stephen Susco) to allow Shimizu to refine and improve the spookiest highlights of his earlier version, which enjoyed previous incarnations as a short film and two made-for-Japanese-video features. Surprising box-office analysts with a $40 million opening weekend, The Grudge may disappoint hard-core horror fans because it lacks gore and graphic violence, but as a creepy tale about a very haunted house, it's guaranteed to send a few chills up your spine. - Jeff Shannon

The Grudge 2 The Grudge 2 - US

The Grudge 2 is a spooky installment in Takashi Shimizu's hardworking Ju-on/Grudge series of horror pictures. It doesn't carry the disorienting thrill of the very first Japanese Ju-on features, but it's a lot creepier than anybody could have expected. The story picks up from the end of the first Hollywood version of The Grudge, and has nothing to do with Ju-on 2, Shimizu's Japanese sequel. Sarah Michelle Gellar returns (a distinctly supporting role) as an American woman traumatized by her experiences with a haunted house in Tokyo; younger sister Amber Tamblyn flies over to help out. This particular storyline doesn't have much meat on it; the murder house is still there, and people who go inside have a disconcerting habit of dropping dead. Fortunately, two other plots thread into the basic one: a group of American schoolgirls in Tokyo become intrigued by the legend of the house, and some Chicago apartment dwellers are unsettled by domestic anxiety and the weird sounds coming from next door. (This storyline, featuring Jennifer Beals, gives the film its extremely satisfying opening sequence.)  As usual with these movies, sequences come to us in non-chronological order, and it's up to us to piece it together. You can guess where the film is going, but the slow trajectory toward its final sequences is surprisingly involving. The movie was widely panned upon its release, which says more about the presumption of the law of diminishing sequel returns than the film itself--it's a decent little horror flick. - Robert Horton

The Grudge 3 - US

From Ghost House Pictures, the makers of 30 DAYS OF NIGHT and THE GRUDGE, comes the next instalment in THE GRUDGE series. How do you stop a curse that never dies? Jake, the sole survivor of THE GRUDGE 2 massacre, is tortured by chilling visions of Kayako and Toshio that have led to his hospitalization. Jake's caretaker, Dr. Sullivan (Shawnee Smith, the Saw series) is determined to investigate his horrifying tales. She explores his Chicago home, finding another family on the brink of succumbing to the curse. It becomes clear that Jake's terrifying stories are true, and a mysterious Japanese woman may be the only hope of banishing the spirits forever...unless her plan destroys them all. - Amazon Synopsis

1-9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

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Angeldust - My Video Collection