Angeldust - My Video Collection

My Video Collection

After cataloguing my music collection I thought it was about time I did my films as well.  I have controversially listed all sequels alongside their original counterpart so that series can be viewed as one.  Many thanks to  Amazon for the plagiarised review data & artwork, where available this has saved me an enormous amount of time.

Please select a letter to browse by title:

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Lady In The water
                                                                                                                                                                                                     
Or, if you prefer, I See Wet People. M. Night Shyamalan's attempt at a newfangled mythology - about a depressed apartment superintendent (Paul Giammatti) who discovers a sea-nymph (Bryce Dallas Howard) who may hold the key to humanity's hopeful future - is intriguing enough to capture the imaginations of children and adults who haven't lost sight of their innocent sense of wonder. Cynics, on the other hand, will likely scoff at Shymalan's awkward fantasy, which includes one victim - a film critic - widely interpreted as Shyaman's revenge against reviewers who panned The Village. Shyamalan originally improvised this melancholy fantasy as a bedtime story for his children;; unfortunately, it still feels mostly half-baked and ultimately ineffective due to a number of plot holes and inconsistencies that a writer as talented as Shyamalan should've been able to avoid. For those wishing to learn more about the film's troubled history, and Shyamalan's petulant split from Disney studios, The Man Who Heard Voices: Or, How M. Night Shyamalan Risked His Career on a Fairy Tale is an interesting read. - Jeff Shannon

Låt Den Rätte Komma In

The enduring popularity of the vampire myth rests, in part, on sexual magnetism. In Let the Right One In, Tomas Alfredson's carefully controlled, yet sympathetic take on John Ajvide Lindqvist's Swedish bestseller-turned-screenplay, the protagonists are pre-teens, unlike the fully-formed night crawlers of HBO’s True Blood or Catherine Hardwicke’s Twilight (both also based on popular novels). Instead, 12-year-old Oskar (future heartbreaker Kåre Hedebrant) and Eli (Lina Leandersson) enter into a deadly form of puppy love. The product of divorce, Oskar lives with his harried mother, while his new neighbor resides with a mystery man named Håkan (Per Ragnar), who takes care of her unique dietary needs. From the wintery moment in 1982 that the lonely, towheaded boy spots the strange, dark-haired girl skulking around their outer-Stockholm tenement, he senses a kindred spirit. They bond, innocently enough, over a Rubik's Cube, but little does Oskar realise that Eli has been 12 for a very long time. Meanwhile, at school, bullies torment the pale and morbid student mercilessly. Through his friendship with Eli, Oskar doesn't just learn how to defend himself, but to become a sort of predator himself, begging the question as to whether Eli really exists or whether she represents a manifestation of his pent-up anger and resentment. Naturally, the international success of Lindqvist's fifth feature, like Norway's chilling Insomnia before it, has inspired an American remake, which is sure to boast superior special effects, but can't possibly capture the delicate balance he strikes here between the tender and the terrible. - Kathleen C. Fennessy

Let Me In
Let Me In

Let Me In blends the innocent face of Chloe Grace Moretz (Kick-Ass) with the darkness of vampirism. A young boy named Owen (Kodi Smit-McPhee, The Road) has troubles at home (his parents are divorcing) and at school (bullies pick on him mercilessly). But when a mysterious girl named Abby (Moretz) moves in next door, Owen hopes he's found a friend, even though she smells a little strange. Unfortunately, his new friend needs blood to live, and the man who seems to be her father (Richard Jenkins, Six Feet Under) goes out to drain local residents to feed her. But even as Owen starts to suspect something is wrong, having a real friend might just matter more. Because the Swedish film adaptation of the novel Let the Right One In (on which Let Me In is based) was surprisingly popular and critically acclaimed, it's going to be hard for Let Me In to avoid comparisons. Surprisingly, it retains much of the flavor and spirit of the original. It's not as understated--this is an American movie, after all--and some of the creepiness is lost along with that subtlety. Despite that, Let Me In has its own spookiness and the performances (including Elias Koteas, Zodiac, as a local policeman) are strong. Directed by Matt Reeves (Cloverfield). - Bret Fetzer, Amazon
The Long Kiss Goodnight The Long Kiss Goodnight

Geena Davis and her former husband, director Renny Harlin, attempted to pick up the pieces after the debacle of their box-office disaster, Cutthroat Island. What they came up with was The Long Kiss Goodnight, a repulsive ode to American film noir, based on a script by Shane Black (Lethal Weapon) about an amnesiac schoolteacher (Davis) who searches for her true identity and finds she is actually a secret agent immersed in a deadly plot to topple the government. Mechanistic in its violence, obnoxious in its attitude, the film makes Davis, a once-promising actress, nothing more than a special effect. She tosses one to sadists in the audience by allowing her character to be beaten, punched unconscious and tortured. - Tom Keogh
Looper Looper

In the futuristic action thriller Looper, time travel will be invented - but it will be illegal and only available on the black market. When the mob wants to get rid of someone, they will send their target 30 years into the past, where a looper" - a hired gun, like Joe (Joseph Gordon-Levitt) - is waiting to mop up. Joe is getting rich and life is good... until the day the mob decides to "close the loop," sending back Joe's future self (Bruce Willis) for assassination. The film is written and directed by Rian Johnson and also stars Emily Blunt,Paul Dano, and Jeff Daniels. Ram Bergman and James D. Stern produce. - Amazon Synopsis
Lord Of The Rings: Return Of The King

Peter Jackson's Lord of the Rings trilogy, triumphantly completed by the 11-Oscar-winning The Return of the King, sets out to show that Tolkien's epic work, once derided as mere adolescent escapism, is not just fodder for the best mass entertainment spectacle ever seen on the big screen, but is also replete with emotionally satisfying meditations on the human condition. What is the nature of true friendship? What constitutes real courage? Why is it important for us to care about people living beyond our borders? What does it mean to live in harmony with the environment and what are the consequences when we do not? When is war justifiable and when is it not? What things are really worth fighting for? These are the questions that resonate with a contemporary audience: to see our current social and political concerns mirrored--and here finally resolved--in Middle-earth is to recognise that Jackson's Lord of the Rings is both a parable for our times and magical cinematic escapism. As before, in this concluding part of the trilogy the spectacle never dwarfs (sic) the characters, even during Shelob the spider's pitiless assault, for example, or the unparalleled Battle of the Pelennor Fields, where the white towers of Minas Tirith come under ferocious attack from Troll-powered siege weapons and--in a sequence reminiscent of the Imperial Walkers in The Empire Strikes Back--Mammoth-like Mumakil. The people and their feelings always remain in focus, as emphasised by Jackson's sensitive small touches: Gandalf reassuring a terrified Pippin in the midst of battle that death is not to be feared;; Frodo's blazing anger at Sam's apparent betrayal;; Faramir's desire to win the approval of his megalomaniac father;; Gollum's tragic cupidity and his final, heartbreaking glee. And at the very epicentre of the film is the pure heart of Samwise Gamgee--the real hero of the story. At over three hours, there are almost inevitably some lulls, and the film still feels as if some key scenes are missing: a problem doubtless to be rectified in the extended DVD edition. But the end, when it does finally arrive--set to Howard Shore's Wagnerian music score--brings us full circle, leaving the departing audience to wonder if they will ever find within themselves even a fraction of the courage of a hobbit. - Mark Walker
The Lost Boys

This 1987 thriller was a predictable hit with the teen audience it worked overtime to attract. Like most of director Joel Schumacher's films, it's conspicuously designed to push the right marketing and demographic buttons and, granted, there's some pretty cool stuff going on here and there. Take Kiefer Sutherland, for instance. In Stand by Me he played a memorable bully, but here he goes one step further as a memorable bully vampire who leads a tribe of teenage vampires on their nocturnal spree of bloodsucking havoc. Jason Patric plays the new guy in town, who quickly attracts a lovely girlfriend (Jami Gertz), only to find that she might be recruiting him into the vampire fold. The movie gets sillier as it goes along, and resorts to a routine action-movie showdown, but it's a visual knockout (featuring great cinematography by Michael Chapman) and boasts a cast that's eminently able (pardon the pun) to sink their teeth into the best parts of an uneven screenplay. - Jeff Shannon
Lost Boys The Thirst
Lost Boys: The Thirst

I put off watching this for many years for fear of ruining the above masterpiece, but decided I would have to watch it sooner or later.  It can't be that bad, surely?  Unfortunately it is.  Seriously, don't watch it. - NB
Love 2011
Love

After losing contact with earth, astronaut Lee Miller becomes stranded in orbit alone aboard an international space station. As time passes, and his life support systems start to dwindle, Lee has to battle to maintain his sanity and stay alive. His world becomes a lonely, claustrophobic and dangerous existence, until he makes a strange discovery aboard the ship that changes everything. In the tradition of 2001 - A Space Odyssey', Inception' and Moon', Love is a unique, spectacular and thought provoking film that will keep you thinking long after the credits roll.
Lucy
Lucy

Scarlett Johansson and Morgan Freeman star in this sci-fi action thriller written and directed by Luc Besson. Johansson stars as the titular heroine who finds herself caught up in the dodgy dealings of the Taiwanese mob while living in Taipei. Forced into becoming a smuggler, she is drugged before a package is inserted into her stomach for safe transit. Lucy is then severely beaten for protesting her situation which results in the package bursting inside her and leaking into her bloodstream. As the drug takes over her body, Lucy becomes capable of using a higher brain capacity than humans are naturally accustomed to which makes her able to use telekinesis and absorb knowledge rapidly. Meanwhile, neurological scientist Professor Norman (Freeman) takes an interest in Lucy's evolution as she takes revenge on those responsible for her extraordinary transformation and evades those who wish to harness her powers for their own ends. - Amazon Synopsis

1-9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

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Angeldust - My Video Collection