Angeldust - My Video Collection

My Video Collection

After cataloguing my music collection I thought it was about time I did my films as well.  I have controversially listed all sequels alongside their original counterpart so that series can be viewed as one.  Many thanks to  Amazon for the plagiarised review data & artwork, where available this has saved me an enormous amount of time.

Please select a letter to browse by title:

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The Objective
The Objective

When reconnaissance satellites pick a radioactive heat signature in a remote tribal region of Afghanistan, CIA Agent Ben Keynes and his highly trained Special Ops team are sent in to investigate the phenomenon. Amid the bedlam of the war-torn region, the Agency fears that Al-Qaida has finally got its hands on a nuclear weapon. As the team head into the barren Afghan desert it soon becomes clear that this threat may be coming from something infinitely more powerful and definitely not human.  - Amazon Synopsis
Oblivion  
Oblivion

Tom Cruise stars in Oblivion, an original and groundbreaking cinematic event from the director of TRON: Legacy and the producer of Rise of the Planet of the Apes. On a spectacular future Earth that has evolved beyond recognition, one man’s confrontation with the past will lead him on a journey of redemption and discovery as he battles to save mankind. 

Jack Harper (Cruise) is one of the last few drone repairmen stationed on Earth. Part of a massive operation to extract vital resources after decades of war with a terrifying threat known as the Scavs, Jack’s mission is nearly complete. 

Living and patrolling the breathtaking skies from thousands of feet above, his soaring existence is brought crashing down when he rescues a beautiful stranger from a downed spacecraft. Her arrival triggers a chain of events that forces him to question everything he knows and puts the fate of humanity in his hands. - Amazon Synopsis
                                                                                                                                                                                      
One Flew Over The Cuckoos Nest

One flew over the cuckoos nest is a great film showing off Jack Nicholson's talent for playing extreme characters.  Playing a convict who successfully passes himself off as a loon to avoid imprisonment, it follows his story as he befriends the inmates of the mental health facility helping them to break out of their shells and truly live.  The whole cast perform outstandingly & make this a film not to miss.  NB


One Hour Photo

One Hour Photo marks Robin Williams' third film running as the bad guy, following on from Insomnia and the straight-to-video (in the UK) Death to Smoochy. It's also his most chilling role to date. Playing "photo guy" Sy Parrish, obsessed by the seemingly perfect family who are his most regular customers, he paints a desperate image of a lonely, fanatical man whose only comfort lies in imagining himself a part of the lives of the wealthy, happy Yorkins family (headed by Connie Nielsen). Devastated by being fired from his job at the processing lab, and making a shocking discovery on his exit, he descends into psychosis. Director and screenwriter Mark Romanek, previously best known for his Nine Inch Nails and Madonna music videos, has made a stylish, distinctive entry into the world of mainstream movies; the film combines an ever-intensifying sense of menace with some unconventional shocks that never descend into clichés. Refreshingly, the film is presented from Parrish's point of view rather than the Yorkins', and it's a real (if disquieting) treat to see Williams ditch his usual bumbling buffoon character and get another meaty role to sink his teeth into. Eschewing the formulas and devices of the standard thriller with bleak effectiveness, One Hour Photo is a far more intelligent proposition than most of its peers--though it may be a disappointment to those expecting visceral thrills. - Rikki Price

  One Missed Call - Japanese

You can be justified in suffering from "Ring fatigue". This is yet another Japanese Ringu clone -- same concept, different method of infection. But "One Missed Call" is a pretty effective chiller in its own right, and one of the better clones. Well worth watching and, if you're not too fatigued by the whole concept, an entertaining ride. This time the technological virus is spread via mobile phone. We've all got 'em, and certainly every Japanese schoolgirl has one permanently stapled to her ear, so it's instantly more familiar than a VCR tape. And it's a neat enough paranoia, because there's nothing you can do about it -- unlike a video tape, which you don't have to watch. Here you're infected simply if a person who is infected has your phone number in their phone's memory. Like an email virus, it spreads against your will. The concept is dead simple. You get a message on your mobile. It's from yourself. It's from a couple of days in the future. You hear yourself scream horribly as you die. Sure enough, at the precise date and time of the message, you die horribly. And somebody else whose number is in your phone gets a message. There's an interesting echo of the US movie "Final Destination" here, but for the most part this is just more Japanese race-against-time chills, with almost exactly the same back plot as "Ringu" -- an evil child with psychic powers radiating gruesome revenge from beyond the grave. Unlike "Final Destination", there are no big budget special effects and it's all slow-burn horror. Basically, you can boil it down to a bunch of school girls terrorized by a serial killer on their mobile phones. It's all pretty predictable and your heartbeat won't get elevated (after saying that, once I jumped right out of my seat -- thanks to a sudden nasty noise placed immediately behind me in the surround sound). But it's well acted and directed, it does have a creepy atmosphere, and even though the scenario is familiar, and the crawling half-glimpsed figures in shadows, fingers appearing out of cupboards, creaky sound effects and girls cowering in corners with eyes bulging are all too familiar now, this one does them well -- the plot even hangs together, which is more than can be said for that trio of dreadful Korean "haunted school" movies. The movie even has a few genuinely interesting tricks. In one sequence, a girl who's had the message is grabbed by a bunch of TV producers and forced onto a set to broadcast her death live to the world as it happens. The actions of the media on this poor bewildered and terrified girl are almost more horrible than the curse itself. - Gigidunnit, Japan

One Missed Call 2 - Japanese

You can be justified in suffering from "Ring fatigue". This is yet another Japanese Ringu clone -- same concept, different method of infection. But "One Missed Call" is a pretty effective chiller in its own right, and one of the better clones. Well worth watching and, if you're not too fatigued by the whole concept, an entertaining ride. This time the technological virus is spread via mobile phone. We've all got 'em, and certainly every Japanese schoolgirl has one permanently stapled to her ear, so it's instantly more familiar than a VCR tape. And it's a neat enough paranoia, because there's nothing you can do about it -- unlike a video tape, which you don't have to watch. Here you're infected simply if a person who is infected has your phone number in their phone's memory. Like an email virus, it spreads against your will. The concept is dead simple. You get a message on your mobile. It's from yourself. It's from a couple of days in the future. You hear yourself scream horribly as you die. Sure enough, at the precise date and time of the message, you die horribly. And somebody else whose number is in your phone gets a message. There's an interesting echo of the US movie "Final Destination" here, but for the most part this is just more Japanese race-against-time chills, with almost exactly the same back plot as "Ringu" -- an evil child with psychic powers radiating gruesome revenge from beyond the grave. Unlike "Final Destination", there are no big budget special effects and it's all slow-burn horror. Basically, you can boil it down to a bunch of school girls terrorized by a serial killer on their mobile phones. It's all pretty predictable and your heartbeat won't get elevated (after saying that, once I jumped right out of my seat -- thanks to a sudden nasty noise placed immediately behind me in the surround sound). But it's well acted and directed, it does have a creepy atmosphere, and even though the scenario is familiar, and the crawling half-glimpsed figures in shadows, fingers appearing out of cupboards, creaky sound effects and girls cowering in corners with eyes bulging are all too familiar now, this one does them well -- the plot even hangs together, which is more than can be said for that trio of dreadful Korean "haunted school" movies. The movie even has a few genuinely interesting tricks. In one sequence, a girl who's had the message is grabbed by a bunch of TV producers and forced onto a set to broadcast her death live to the world as it happens. The actions of the media on this poor bewildered and terrified girl are almost more horrible than the curse itself. - Sakura, Amazon
Patterns And Textures The Orb: Adventures Beyond The Ultraworld, Patterns & Textures

A fantastic collection of video's from the early half of the Orb's career.  The video mixing can seem a little dated in places but nothing can detract from the fantastic music.  Enjoyable throughout.  NB
The Orb: C-Batter-C

Having spent over two decades fast forwarding the future while looking at the world through its own inimitable super-telescope, The Orb's next album project returns to Earth and also goes back in time as Alex Paterson teams up with graphic artist/video maker Mike Coles to release C Batter C, a powerfully evocative audio-visual celebration of family, vanishing London and times gone by. Released on November 11 [11,11,11], the unique package is the physical manifestation of Battersea Bunches, the film shown at Brixton s Red Gate Gallery last December along with an exhibition of related visuals by Colesy. The soundtrack is a 17-minute, specially-written piece by Alex and esteemed Berlin-based electronic pioneer Thomas Fehlmann, an Orb satellite member for over 20 years, now accompanied by a string of remixes which home in on the track s constantly morphing moods and take them further out in total sympathy. While the world gets increasingly more snarled up in instant hit gratification and soul-sucking technology, thankfully there are still corresponding currents in art and music which cast back to simpler, more innocent times; recalling childhood glimmers, mysterious half-memories and indelible images. On another level, these can be haunting and irreplaceable, especially when of a vanished location or dear friend or relative no longer here. Using the derelict but still imposing shell of Battersea Power station as centre-piece, the 17-minute film is based on Super 8 footage shot by Alex s Aunt Lil of a 1956 family day out led by his father. The three kids - his brother Martin and cousins Sue and Jen - are obviously having a great time feeding the ducks in Battersea Park [overseen by the still-billowing power station] and pigeons in Trafalgar Square, along with a journey along the River Thames from Battersea to Greenwich, taking in other London landmarks such as Tower Bridge, St Paul s Cathedral and Big Ben, the same spots effectively cut between then and now. The film is, in turn trippy, fascinating, emotions-stoking and sometimes incredibly poignant, lingering long after it s finished, bound to inspire similar warm memories for the viewer. It s without doubt the most personal project that Alex has embarked upon, Colesy surpassing himself on the editing. Alex and Thomas hauntingly atmospheric soundtrack is a remarkable counterpart to the film, veering from spectral mood-enhancing to beautifully melodic, the marching band sequence a particularly nagging half-memory. The CD features the original soundtrack along with an electronica-spanning bevy of remixes by Gaudi, H.F.B., David Harrow, Nocturnal Sunshine, Autolump, Being and Fehlmann/Orb, ranging from ghostly dubstep to contagious techno-boogie. These are producers which the Orb loves and trusts implicitly; not one fails to to turn up trumps. The DVD boasts the original film plus three video mixes and both discs come in a gorgeous 60-page hardback book [the cover based on Alex s father s pilot's log-book] featuring Colesy's film-related images, plus poetry and musings by Alex and his Aunt Lil. Such love, care and intricacy is a rare thing in the modern world. The Orb and Malicious Damage are about to unleash a new kind of time capsule classic. Even by referencing the past, the future can still be prodded.

 

The Orphanage - Spanish

Backed by Guillermo del Toro and yet made by a surprisingly inexperienced group of film makers (especially considering the end result), The Orphanage is a chilling, tense supernatural thriller that could certainly teach more established directors a thing or two about how to send shivers down the spine.  It tells the story of a woman, Laura, returning to the orphanage where she was raised as a child. Her plans are to look after sick children there, but it doesn’t take long for things to go awry. Without giving too much away, visions from her past and a threat to her own family are the starting points for a complex and quite haunting thriller, that stays in the mind long after the credits have rolled. A film that works on more than one level, The Orphanage really is some piece of work. Juan Antonia Bayona, behind the camera, generates an incredibly atmospheric mood that underpins the film, and wisely takes time to put pieces in place. He’s aided by a terrific cast, and an unsettling screenplay that layers in an uneasy horror that’s as anti-Hollywood as it comes. The result of all of this is one of the scariest films of recent times, and yet something that still manages to be that little bit more, that sticks in your mind for some time afterwards. Make no mistake, The Orphanage really is something different, and all the better for it. - Jon Foster

The Others The Others

A welcome throwback to the spooky traditions of Jack Clayton's The Innocents and Robert Wise's The Haunting, Alejandro Amenábar's The Others favours atmosphere, sound, and suggestion over flashy special effects. Set in 1945 on a fog-enshrouded island off the British coast, the film begins with a scream as Grace (Nicole Kidman) awakens from some unspoken horror, perhaps arising from her religiously overprotective concern for her young children, Anne (Alakina Mann) and Nicholas (James Bentley). The children are hypersensitive to light and have lived in a musty manor with curtains and shutters perpetually drawn. With Grace's husband (Christopher Eccleston) presumably lost at war, this ominous setting perfectly accommodates a sense of dreaded expectation, escalating when three strangers arrive in response to Grace's yet-unposted request for domestic help. Led by housekeeper Mrs Mills (Fionnula Flanagan), this mysterious trio is as closely tied to the house's history as Grace's family is--as are the past occupants seen posthumously in a long-forgotten photo album. With her justly acclaimed performance, Kidman maintains an emotional intensity that fuels the film's supernatural underpinnings. And while Amenábar's pacing is deliberately slow, it befits the tone of penetrating anxiety, leading to a twist that extends the story's reach from beyond the grave. Amenábar unveiled a similarly effective twist in his Spanish thriller Open Your Eyes (remade by Cameron Crowe as Vanilla Sky), but where that film drew debate, The Others is finely crafted to provoke well-earned goose bumps and chills down the spine.
- Jeff Shannon, Amazon.com

Outbreak

When Warner Brothers was unable to secure the rights to Richard Preston's terrifying non-fiction book The Hot Zone (purchased by a rival studio), they took the basic idea of a fatal virus on the loose in the US, added Dustin Hoffman and director Wolfgang Petersen (Das Boot) and produced an unusual thriller--a surprise hit--called Outbreak. The other picture, slated to star Robert Redford and Jodie Foster, fell through. The premise of Outbreak, which owes something to Elia Kazan's 1950 plague-scare movie, Panic in the Streets, is as terrifying as it is timely. As developers slash their way deeper into the previously unexplored tropical rainforests, they are exposed to radically new forms of life, including diseases, that in these days of commonplace international travel could turn into deadly epidemics almost before we know it. Hoffman's character and his estranged wife (Rene Russo) are disease experts called in to identify the unknown killer, which was carried into the country by an illegally smuggled monkey. The best sequence shows the disease spreading--through recycled air on a passenger jet or a sneeze in a crowded cinema. The final chase is pretty conventional but the cast is terrific, including Morgan Freeman, Kevin Spacey, Donald Sutherland, Cuba Gooding Jr., J.T. Walsh and Zakes Mokae. - Jim Emerson
Outland

Outland is another in a long line of Westerns retooled for science fiction. Writer-director Peter Hyams (Capricorn One, 2010, Timecop) re-stages High Noon in outer space, with Sean Connery as O'Neil, the marshal for a settlement on one of Jupiter's moons. While investigating the deaths of some miners, O'Neil discovers that mine boss Peter Boyle has been giving his workers an amphetamine-like, work-enhancing drug that keeps them productive for months--until they finally snap and go berserk. When Boyle sends killer henchmen to neutralize the lawman, O'Neil is unable to get the miners to back him up. Outland is no classic but it offers solid suspense in an otherworldly atmosphere. It also stars Frances Sternhagen, James B. Sikking (Howard on television's Hill Street Blues) and John Ratzenberger (later to become famous as Cliff on the sitcom Cheers). - Jim Emerson
Out Of The Dark
Out Of The Dark

When a young family leave their home in the US for South America to run the family business they believe they are moving to a better life. Their hopes of a happy existence are soon cruelly dashed when they notice strange happenings in their new home. They discover that the house is haunted by the souls of tormented children and that s just the beginning of the nightmare. Determined to find the root of this supernatural plague they soon discover more than they bargained as they uncover twisted and sinister secrets hidden behind the success of their family business.

 

Outpost

Rome's Ray Stevenson stars in the war-based horror film Outpost. As war ravages Eastern Europe, a battle-hardened team of mercenaries undertake a dangerous mission into no-man's land at the behest of a mysterious businessman. Surrounded by hostile forces, they fight their way to a half-century-old underground Nazi bunker, a place where soldiers were experimented on to create a super-human army. The mutilated remains of those soldiers still exist along with a ghastly discovery--a survivor. Then suddenly, the men are attacked by primeval, horrific forces, protecting another secret--a nightmare they and the entire world will now have to face. - Amazon Synopsis
Over Your Dead Body
Over Your Dead Body - Japanese

Stage star Miyuki Goto plays the lead in a new play based on the ghost story Yotsuya Kaidan. She pulls some strings to get her lover Kosuke cast in the play, even though he's an unknown actor. Off stage the cast's possessive love and obsessions exist as reality. Trapped between the play and reality, the cast's feelings for each other cross the blurred line between reality and fantasy.

1-9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

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Angeldust - My Video Collection